All Posts by Steve Greenlaw

What Makes a Compelling Faculty Development Opportunity?

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This post is going to be short and I hope sweet. The best faculty development opportunities I’ve experienced in my career haven’t been designed primarily (or explicitly?) for faculty development:  Examples include UMW’s Faculty Academy, ELI Annual Conferences, at least … Continue reading →
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Tolstoy, Economics and OER

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OpenStax - $ Contribution page
David Wiley wrote a recent blog post that had me scratching my head. In the post, David argued that OER is in a feature of the resource, not who is providing it and whether the provider is offering it for … Continue reading →
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A Cautionary Tale about Expectations

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I was talking the other day to a fairly senior administrator in academic affairs about OpenLearning18.  This administrator has been very supportive of our institution’s open initiative, and so I was just bringing him/her up to date on things open. … Continue reading →
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A Conceptual Framework?

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Vancouver Trips Festival 1966
I participated in OpenLearning17 and am back for OpenLearning18.  Why you ask?  Because I learned enough last year to articulate better questions this year.  Last year, I went in somewhat blind.  (There might be something we can learn as teachers … Continue reading →
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MOOCs and Motivation: Part 2

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WEEK FIVE: A Week of Digital Literacy
This post is a continuation of the previous one, but digs deeper into the question of why participants fail to complete MOOCs  It is speculative and personal. It’s possibly based too much on my own experience, so take it for what … Continue reading →
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MOOCs and Motivation: Part 1

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The powers of the President to protect our country are very substantial and will not be questioned.
One of the criticisms of MOOCS has been that while they enroll a large number of participants, only a few finish. We had this experience with #OpenLearning17, but I wonder if it’s a bug or a feature. In this post, … Continue reading →
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Virginia Faculty Collaboratives Panel Presentation at ODU Center for Learning & Teaching Summer Institute

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[View the story “ODU Center for Learning & Teaching Summer Institute: Open Educational Resources (OER): Leveraging Resources for…” on Storify]
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On the nonlinear way my mind works

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I always get a thrill on those occasions where, for a while, many things I read or hear or see seem to be on the same topic. Or maybe it’s just my mind seeing connections. This is a longish post, … Continue reading →
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Using Hypothes.is to Help Students Read Scholarly Papers

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One of the things I’ve learned from #OpenLearning17 has been the ability to use Hypothes.is to collaboratively read something online.  Hypothes.is is free software that allows one to annotate any webpage as one is reading.  The annotations are a layer … Continue reading →
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A New Model for OER: Anthologies Instead of Textbooks?

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I have heard that sometimes adjunct faculty are assigned to teach a class at the last minute, often with the textbook already chosen and sometimes with a syllabus to follow. No one should argue that this is an ideal situation. … Continue reading →
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