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CBME at Oregon Health & Science University

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Competency-Based Medical Education (CBME) focuses design (and the designer) on learner objectives and outcomes.  Milestones, which are created through the study of typical development, help track a learner’s progress from novice to expert across any number of tasks. Information about a learner’s progress is collected from diverse sources in a variety of ways and kept... […]
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Workplace-Based Assessment in Competency-Based Medical Education

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CBME chart
Competency-based education expresses competency as a progression through milestones: criterion-referenced, performance-based trajectory from novice to expert for any number of behaviors.  The most commonly used development framework used for expressing milestones in clinical contexts is Miller’s Pyramid of Clinical Skills, Competency, and Performance:  Know, Know How, Show How, Do. As discussed in my last blog post, competency-based... […]
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Competency-Based Medical Education – The Basics

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Introduction Like all fields, healthcare is engaging with the characteristics and consequences of our digital society. Data with varying degrees of contextualization pours in from diverse sources.  Knowledge changes fast. Problems are complex.  In this new age, healthcare professionals (like everyone else) must not only be technical experts, but also team workers, lifelong learners, creative... […]
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My Digital and Medical Education Mash-up

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It’s been almost a year since I joined the iDesign team as a learning architect and nine months since I was promoted to senior learning architect.  For much of that, I have worked with Mayo Clinic School of Medicine on the creation of a flipped classroom experience for first- and second-year medical students.  We designed... […]
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The Professional Ethos

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Australian_Capital_Territory_Legislative_Assembly_and_the_statue_Ethos
Although Open Learning ’18 has come and gone, the questions and issues linger in my mind. I continue to think about faculty development, and more widely, professional development. I wonder about the routine and damaging separation of skills and content, … Continue reading →
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Faculty Development in the Open

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What does it mean to do faculty development in the open? How is it different than typical faculty development experiences? For me, faculty development in the open allows me to connect with learners I might not otherwise encounter. My professional development tends to focus on library conferences where I get to talk and network with […]
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“The Moral Crisis of the University”

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Belshazzar’s Feast by Rembrandt
Michael B. Katz is a new discovery for me (h/t Roving Librarian). His scholarship on the history of public education in the U.S.is fascinating, troubling, and revelatory. I’m sure his conclusions are contested–whose aren’t?–but at times the clarity and forcefulness … Continue reading →
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Faculty Development

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I want to take a moment to emphasize the value of faculty development in an open environment.  Both OpenLearning17 and OpenLearning18 provided opportunities to explore open pedagogy “in the open.” They also created a space for connecting with other faculty members and administrators with an interest in open education. I value my time in both […]
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What Makes a Compelling Faculty Development Opportunity?

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This post is going to be short and I hope sweet. The best faculty development opportunities I’ve experienced in my career haven’t been designed primarily (or explicitly?) for faculty development:  Examples include UMW’s Faculty Academy, ELI Annual Conferences, at least … Continue reading →
via: openlearning – Pedablogy: Musings on the Art & Craft of Teaching Read More

Tolstoy, Economics and OER

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OpenStax - $ Contribution page
David Wiley wrote a recent blog post that had me scratching my head. In the post, David argued that OER is in a feature of the resource, not who is providing it and whether the provider is offering it for … Continue reading →
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